Salmon 1 – Lazy 0

31 08 2012

Oak Bay – Vancouver Island BC…

In Baja Mexico I am an experienced fish assassin, but until recently I was a Vancouver Island fish slaying virgin. Not that I caught any fish on this particular trip, but I tried!

My recon trolling track…

I checked local fishing reports and the area around Oak Bay seemed like a good local spot to try for some spring salmon. There was better fishing further west towards Sooke & Port Renfrew, but I didn’t have the time to drive that far and until I get rid of my kayak fishing rust I want to stick close to home.

Oak Bay Marina…

I parked at the Oak Bay Marina. You don’t need a boat ramp to launch a kayak, but there is a fair bit of paddle and fishing gear to haul to the water so being able to rig the yak at your vehicle and pull it to the water on a cart is handy if not absolutely essential.

Necky Dolphin kayak…

My kayak is a 14′ old Necky Dolphin sit-on-top that’s 12yrs old. I bought it new when Necky Kayaks was a Canadian company and they made their boats in BC. The company has since been bought by Ocean Kayak in the US and this design is no longer made at all. Too bad because it’s proven to be a very capable recreational boat for me. It handles rough water well and can carry enough cargo for some light touring.

Got fish?

This kayak has been with me on a lot of Baja adventures. It’s a great fishing platform because it’s stable allowing you to confidently fight your catch when you hook up and it still paddles efficiently to cover ground to hunt for fish. The roto-molded plastic hull is rugged enough to haul over rocks or accidentally run into something in the shallows without any damage.

Spare paddle and pump…

I don’t have a waterproof camera at the moment so I wasn’t able to document my fishing mission from the water. My main goal was to make sure all my gear worked and iron out any kinks in the system when there was no pressure to accomplish anything. I checked the weather and tides so I wouldn’t be battling any wind, waves or current. Once away from the marina I just headed out into the Straight of Juan de Fuca to an area there were some fishermen in powerboats trolling.

Kayak gear…

I saw some bait fish jumping, but didn’t get any bites. My rod is a medium action spinning setup and the large sinking weight the fishing store sold me to get the salmon flasher and lure down to where the fish are was a bit too much for my gear. In Baja I use the same gear to troll small Rapala lures so it’s not shocking that it’s not ideal for salmon hunting off Vancouver Island.

Killing ‘em in Baja back in the day…

I won’t spend much time talking about fishing gear until I sort out what works and have some salmon to prove it. Here is a link to a good PNW salmon fishing resource if you are keen to learn more from someone who actually knows what the heck they are doing.. ;)

Cruising the Sea of Cortez on a fish hunt…

My buddy Sean has the same kayak and has expressed an interest in fishing with me. Hopefully we’ll have some yak fishing tales to tell this fall.





Seaward Kayaks Factory Tour – Part 5

31 05 2012

Click on image for more photos…

I took another trip up to the Seaward Kayaks factory in Chemainus BC last Friday to poke around and snap more photos. If kayak factory porn makes you smile click on either image in this post to jump to my Seaward Kayaks Flickr set. The bottom 60 or so photos are new.

Click on image to see more photos…

Click here if you want to read some of my other Seaward Kayaks blog posts.

Click on image for more photos…





Seaward Cosma Kayak Review

22 02 2012

Seaward Cosma waiting for me to get going...

The nice folks at Seaward Kayaks lent me a 16’2″ Cosma touring kayak to paddle for a few days in December. I have spent many months sea kayaking and touring, but almost all of my experience has been down in the warm waters of the Sea of Cortez off the coast of Baja Mexico in low performance plastic sit-on-top boats. I am an competent paddler whose never been in a state of the art boat. So getting a chance to try out a sweet kevlar sea kayak put a big smile on my face.

Long and lean...

Although looks are not the primary reason you buy a sea kayak it’s always nice to be stoked about your boat. I was in a rush the day I picked up te Cosma so I didn’t spend much time looking at it. I just strapped it to my car and drove it home. I stashed it in my backyard in the dark and went about making dinner. The next AM I walked out on to my deck and was totally mesmerized by the clean lines and sleek profile of the Cosma. My plastic kayaks have served me well, but to be honest they are F-ugly! I didn’t appreciate how gnarly they looked until I had this Seaward boat sitting in my yard 3′ from the old boats.

She looks fast even on grass!

Once I got over the sleek lines and general sexiness of the Cosma I spent a hour checking out all the cool details and expert craftsmanship that went into making her. I get fascinated with beautiful sea kayaks, mountain bikes and surfboards because they look so amazing and at the same time their purpose is to go out into some of the harshest environments and perform reliably for us. So their beauty is very deep – it’s the beauty of their appearance, the beauty of how they perform and the beauty of how tough they are.

Kevlar...

Getting over the visual appeal of the Cosma I had to move it to the side of my yard and enjoyed how light it was. My other kayaks are not as long as the Cosma and they can’t haul as much, but they are a lot heavier. I could move the Seaward with one hand and without feeling like I was in a weight lifting competition. That would prove very handy for loading onto the roof of our car solo.

Deck bungees...

All the deck attachments are very robust.

Rear hatch...

On my longest kayak tour 4 months in Baja I developed a love-hate relationship with my boat’s hatches. They were small so loading unloading was a chore, but they kept water out which made me happy. The Cosma offers the best of both worlds with large waterproof hatches so you can get what you need easily. This is a must have feature for any boat I buy.

Self-rescue system...

Coming from SOT kayaks one skill I need to work on is my ability to re-enter my boat in the water. Having a proven paddle rescue system on the Cosma made me feel more confident about going through that process. Even though I was too lazy to spend a bunch of time in the cold water during my short test.

Welcome to my office...

A comfortable cockpit is critical to happiness in a touring kayak as much as saddle comfort is important on a touring bike. You spend all day sitting in your boat with limited opportunities to get out and move around. I found the Cosma’s seat and backrest were comfortable for the half day length of paddles I was able to fit in. If I was keeping the Cosma I’d spend some more time tweaking the fit, but as it stands I was pretty happy right out of the gate. The rudder pedals were also easy to adjust and comfortable. I didn’t deploy the rudder as I was having too much fun leaning the Cosma to steer it. I tend not to use my kayak’s rudder unless absolutely necessary so it’s a feature I want to have, but as long as it’s there and works I happy to let it sit on my stern most of the time.

One issue I had with the Cosma’s cockpit was that my legs felt cramped. It’s a very low profile boat and I have long legs with big feet attached. When I get a chance I’d like to try one of Seaward’s high volume boats as I think I would prefer having the extra room. If you are taller that’s something you may want to consider when ordering a kayak.

Rudder deployment control...

A nice feature on the Cosma is having the rudder deployment controls in front of the cockpit for easy access and having them recessed so that you don’t snag anything on it.

Bow details...

Lots of deck rigging options on the bow.

An unusual perspective of the Galloping Goose Trail...

So I want to be clear that I did not test the Cosma to its full potential. Mainly because my kayak skills are rusty and being new to high performance sea kayaks I didn’t want to end up as a statistic in some ocean safety report. I can only report about how she handled for easy day paddles on calm water unloaded.

Here are my thoughts:

  • easy to get into and out of  on shore [strikes a good balance between small cockpit opening and ease of entry]
  • hard chines provide excellent stability
  • you can set the Cosma on edge nicely to turn the boat
  • comfortable seat and backrest
  • very efficient boat
  • glides well and tracks straight

Here is a review from Canoe and Kayak Magazine.

Seaward Cosma specifications - click here...

Click on the image above to read all the Cosma specification details on the Seaward website. I won’t regurgitate the same info again here so let me summarize by saying the Cosma is a great day tripping and light touring boat. My initial impressions have been positive and I’m hoping to get a chance to borrow it again to test in some more demanding paddling conditions.

View from the cockpit...

You can read user reviews of the Cosma over at Paddling.net.

Cosmic beauty...

You can read my Seaward Kayak Factory Tour posts here.





Vibram Five Finger KSO 2yr Review

1 02 2012

Click on image for my previous review...

Let me summarize my long term review of the Vibram Five Finger KSO booties/slippers by saying 3 things:

  • if you kite, windsurf, SUP or surf on the beaches I frequent in Canada and Mexico you either wear something on your feet or you get cut up badly.
  • these KSOs are the best footwear solution I’ve found for these sports in warm to cool water.
  • there is significant room for improvement of this product for the water-sports crowd.

If you want to read my pervious review click on the image above. I’ll only be discussing my long term experiences with the KSOs in this post.

Virtually no wear on the Vibram sole...

The Good:

  • they fit my odd shaped feet reasonably well
  • they don’t interfere with the bindings on my twin tip kiteboard
  • they provide decent board feel on my strapless kiteboards, SUPs and surfboards
  • they provide excellent traction
  • they provide excellent protection from sharp rocks, coral, urchins, glass, etc…
  • soles are very durable
  • available in black so you don’t attract too much attention!
  • reasonably priced for specialized sports footwear

Shredded fabric lets toes our and rocks in...=-(

The Bad:

  • they don’t fit some people
  • not much good in cold water
  • sole is much thicker than needed for protection or durability for board sports
  • thinner sole would provide much better board feel with no downsides
  • fabric tops are not very robust [mine have been ripped open between the toes several times now]
  • once the fabric rips small rocks and sand get in as you walk down the beach and get into the water. This really irritates the feet while you are riding for 3hrs and your skin gets soft.
  • glue is letting go between rubber and fabric along the sides

Bottom line I love how these slippers work compared to a regular neoprene surf bootie, but it’s sad to know I’ll shred the tops after a couple months of beach use while the soles are good for 10 years of abuse. I’ll keep buying them because for now there is no better alternative for warm and cool weather water-sports.

My KSO's have seen better days!

Here is how to improve them for water board sports:

  • make sole 30% thinner for better board feel.
  • they rip mostly between toes when a rock gets in there are rubs the fabric so wrap a thin layer of rubber up the sides of each toe to add to the durability.
  • change top fabric to something 50% more abrasion resistant.
  • to make the Flow neoprene model better increase size of each toe box to account for thicker neoprene material compared to KSO. Currently Flow toe boxes are too small for many people’s feet.
  • make a high top side entry Flow so you can tuck the top under a wetsuit leg to stay warm in cold conditions.

As I said in my original Five Fingers review – kudos to Vibram for brining such a novel and highly functional product to market. They rock in many ways and I’ll be buying a new pair of KSOs now that I have shredded and repaired my 2yr old pair so much they can’t be fixed further. I hope Vibram takes some notice of the concerns listed here. Everyone I’ve met on the beach who uses Five Fingers has had the same experience.





Seaward Kayaks Factory Tour – Part 4

21 01 2012

Painting the seam...

You can read my previous Seaward Factory Tour posts here.

Painted seam drying...

I visited the Seaward Kayaks factory in Chemainus BC in December with my new Canon S95 camera and a tripod. I had hoped to video tape/photograph a thermoform kayak being produced, but my timing was off so I settled for simply taking some better photos of their operation. With a tripod I could make the best of the less than ideal indoor lighting. So here is a bunch of photos from the visit.

Bird's eye view of kayaks in progress...

Seaward Passat tandem...

The other side...

A tandem partially built...

Nicely contrasting hatch and cockpit combings...

Sweet fade deck paint...

High volume boat for the bigger paddler...

Thermoform boat being joined together...

Thermoform hulls trimmed and waiting to be built...

Colourful thermoform decks waiting to be built into boats...

Thermoform plastic hull and deck with seam installed...

Deck, hull and seam taped into place will glue cures...

CNC machine building new kayak form...

Router in action...

Partially finished hull...

Bird's eye view of router...

Prepping interior of kayak...

Thermoform kayaks with transparent bottoms being glued together...

Short recreational plastic decks waiting for a hull...

Glued boats waiting finishing details...

Inspecting glued deck and hull while transparent bottom is being installed...

New prototype rudder system...

Retracted position...

Recessed rudder control...

Current model Seaward rudder...

Rudder control...

Rudder deployed...

I’ll be taling to Seaward and hopefully getting a video made of a thermoform boat being built. Stay tuned if kayak porn interests you…=-)

Bow seam/bumper detail...

Seaward Cosma 16' 2" Kevlar touring kayak...

Seaward was nice enough to lend me a Cosma kevlar single kayak to try out. I’ll be posting my thoughts on it next week.





Seaward Kayaks Factory Tour – Part 3

5 11 2011

 

Seaward kayaks in action...

In Part 1 of this tour we talked about how Seaward Kayaks made their thermoform ABS plastic kayaks. Part 2 looked at the fiberglass/kevlar boats and why they were so nice. In this installment I’m going to discuss which Seaward kayak I’m keen on and why.

Single or Tandem

I spent a long 4 month Baja paddle trip with my friend Anna in two single kayaks. We had an amazing time, but we both agreed that we would never embark upon that sort of trip again unless we had a double kayak. Our paddling speeds were so different that even at my most relaxed pace I was usually 1 bay ahead of her so I would close my eyes and nap while she caught up and I’d leap ahead again. You might say just paddle slower and I tried – I really did. I felt like I’d have to paddle backwards to go any slower. We still ended up miles apart after a couple hours. The second issue is that when the wind picked up and things got rough Anna was not as confident in her paddling skills [she was a novice] so we had to head for the beach early to get her to safety and when we did stay out in the waves she was anxious.

A tandem would have allowed us to stay together for social reasons and make the trip safer. It would also have allowed us to cover 50% more distance each day and made camp in the evenings more fun since nobody would be tense! I was convinced about a tandem kayak years ago, but my recent experiences with a tandem bicycle just confirmed that opinion 100%. Especially in the more dangerous waters of the North Pacific Ocean I’ll feel far better about Sharon and I being in the same boat.

Tandems aren’t all roses they are crazy long, heavy, expensive and you can’t paddle one solo. Trying to move and store a 22′ long boat is pretty epic! On the plus side it’s easier and cheaper than two 18′ single kayaks.

Praying we don't get into a fight today due to vastly different paddling speeds!

Material

All my previous and my current sea kayaks were made of rotomoulded plastic. The dull soft kind that you see for rent at the beach. These boats are cheap, heavy and tough. They tend not to be very efficient due to the limitations of the shapes allowed by the rotomoulding process and because they are targeted at the less hardcore end of the paddling market. I’ve always wanted one of those shiny fiberglass kayaks I see down in Baja that glide through the water so easily and look so nice. So the one thing I was certain about was that I would not be buying another rotomoudled sea kayak.

The tour of the Seaward factory confused me a bit at first since the thermoform ABS kayaks had solved a lot of the things I didn’t like about my old plastic boats while retaining the lower cost compared to fiberglass. They are lighter, stronger, better looking and can be made into more complex shapes than a rotomoulded boat. For a recreational boat I think it’s a no brainer that a thermoform plastic kayak is the best bang for your buck.

The fiberglass boats do offer some important benefits though:

  • 100% customizable
  • can be built in any complex shape for highest performance
  • strongest/stiffest construction option
  • easily repaired and repairs can hardly be noticed [ideal for a long term boat]
  • 30yr+ service life

A morning fishing paddle on the Sea of Cortez...

This makes them best suited for the challenges of long tours with a lot of gear and supplies. On my long Baja tour we each carried 40L of water that weigh 80lbs on top of food for a couple weeks at a time and camping gear. Now double that and put both people in one boat on a rough sea pounding from wave to wave and crashing up onto a beach in a storm. The stresses are phenomenal and orders of magnitude greater than what a recreational boat experiences on a relaxing flatwater paddle.

It’s not surprising then that Seaward’s thermoform line up of kayaks are largely recreational boats suited for less demanding use and their fiberglass/kevlar boats are more focused on the performance touring/expedition market. Since I can only afford one boat it has to be suited for casual day paddles in the Victoria Harbour as well as a 2 month long trip down the Sea of Cortez. If I’m going to spend a lot of $$ on a sea kayak I want to customize it so it works optimally for us which means a fiberglass or kevlar boat.

Kevlar offers the same strength as fiberglass at ~10% less weight, but it costs more. I’m not sure if I would be interested in that feature yet. That’s a decision I’ll leave until just before I place an order. I’m hoping to demo similar kayaks in fiberglass and kevlar to get a hands on feel for the practical differences.

Passat & Passat G3...

Which model?

Based on what we’ve discussed so far the only two Seaward models that fit the bill are:

The key difference is the large center hatch on the G3. You gain a little weight and lose a touch of performance for that feature, but my experience on a long kayak tour says the connivence of easy access to gear is well worth it. These kayaks are very strong, stable boats with rudders for keeping on course with varying winds and waves. Totally overkill for a casual paddle, but you have to get to know your boat close to home in friendly waters before you set out on a challenging tour in new territory.

You can read more about the Passat G3 below or click here to jump to the Seaward G3 product page.

Passat G3 marketing spew...

Colour and Features

Now onto the really important stuff like what colour I’d get?…hahaha…=-) Sharon will get to pick the colour, but I’m leaning towards something simple and classic like the red/black/white scheme shown below. Seaward has a custom colour tool so you can mess around with whatever combinations you think might be nice and see them on a boat.

As for the features I’d order I’m not really sure yet. I need another trip up to Seaward to chat about what the options are and what the pros/cons are for each one. Doug appreciated that this is a huge purchase and was willing to talk about it as much as I wanted to which is cool. I’ve learned so much in that first visit that my brain was on overload. Now that I’ve processed everything it’s time for round two and more detailled questions.

Red is faster right?...=-)

What’s next?

If time allows I’d like to visit Seaward’s factory again and get some more info. I’d like to demo a kayak or two if I can and I’d also like to shoot some video of kayaks being built.





Seaward Kayaks Factory Tour – Part 2

28 10 2011

Sign that welcomes you outside the factory...

In part 1 of this factory tour we had a look at how Seaward’s thermoform ABS plastic kayaks were made. Part 2 will cover fiberglass/kevlar kayaks. Seaward has been making fiberglass kayaks since it started operations 25yrs+ ago compared to making thermoform kayaks for only the last 7yrs. Although fiberglass/kevlar technology isn’t new it still provides the means for Seaward to build its finest kayaks.

This is because:

  • it’s a totally customizable hands on process
  • it provides a very light and strong structure
  • extra material can be utilized in highly stressed areas
  • it has a proven track record of success under extreme conditions
  • it can be easily field repaired
  • factory repairs look 100% good as new and are as strong as new
  • the lifespan of a fiberglass/kevlar kayak is 30yrs+ with minimal maintenance

Kevlar cloth is yellow and fiberglass is the white cloth below...

It’s funny to me that the fiberglass/kevlar section of the Seaward factory has a whole different vibe to the the thermoform areas. Thermoform production feels like a factory and the boats feel like they are being assembled. While the fiberglass production has a craftsman working on a piece of art vibe. There is no sense of mass production and everything is slower and made by hand. It all starts in the room where sheets of fiberglas or kevlar cloth are pulled out onto a big table and cut into the required shapes for each boat.

Kayak hull, deck and hatch patterns...

With patterns and mould available for every boat Seaward has ever made they can reach back into time and build anything they need to which is very cool. Unlike the thermoform boats each fiberglass/kevlar kayak is customized and unique. If you need a bigger volume boat to accommodate you size 15 feet they incorporate that into the production process. Need all the deck line and deck bungee attachement points reinforced? – no problem. A custom colour scheme and just about any feature you can imagine are all possible just ask. Doug mentioned to me that as the process to build a fiberglass boat started he talks to everyone involved and goes over any special customer needs to insure they are incorporated properly.

A deck mould prepped and ready to start building a red deck...

The correct deck mould is pulled from inventory and coloured appropriately for the customer’s order. In the image above a red deck is being built. Cloth and resin are carefully laid down into the mould by hand. This is a very labour intensive process that gets quality checked at each stage to ensure the kayak is being made as designed. The fact this is a hands on job accounts for the ability to customize each boat and also the reason for the higher cost vs. a thermoform boat. Typically a fiberglass kayak takes over 4 times longer than a thermoform one to produce. That’s a difference of about 40hrs vs. 9hrs.

A white hull mould prepped to go with the red deck above...

Unfortunately I didn’t see a fiberglass kayak being built during my visit to the Seaward Factory. I’m hoping to get a chance to pop back up there one day and watch both processes more closely. The engineer in me can’t help, but enjoy geeking out on how these boats are built!…=-) I was interested in how their QC process worked and found out that each step of the construction process was compared to the build ticket and the craftsman starting the new step signed off that the previous step was done correctly. If there was a problem observed it was rectified before production continued. At random points during the build and at the very end the production foreman inspects each kayak to ensure it meets the customer’s order perfectly. The love and pride put into these boats is clear from the way everyone at Seaward talks about them. They aren’t churning out mass produced widgets that are a commodity. The thermoform and especially the fiberglass/kevlar kayaks are treated like floating objects of art which I thought was cool. It’s nice to know the folks who made your boat care so much about it.

The inside of a kayak being built...

Once the deck and hull are ready they are joined with fiberglass seams on the inside and outside. The outer seam also gets it’s own 2 layer gel coat in any of the 15 Seaward colour options. You can order a custom colour pallet for each of the following kayak components: deck, hull, seam, hatches and combing. That makes for 15 x 5 = 75 combinations so you can have a totally unique boat if you want to or you can stick with something more standard.

Glassed in bulkhead...

The interior bulkheads are made of composite materials are glassed to the deck and hull. This combined with the glassed seam makes for any incredibly strong and light kayak.

Nicely contrasting combing...

Doug pointed out that Seaward takes special care to finish the interior of each combing and hatch so that it’s smooth. This ensures there are no rough edges to abrade you or your dry bags. My current plastic 14′ sit on top kayak is great, but it has a small front hatch and rough edges inside so getting gear in and out without compromising their waterproofness is a huge PITA. These kind of small details don’t seem super important in the showroom, but trust me on day 25 of a long trip you’ll be on the edge of insanity if none of your dry bags are keeping your gear 100% dry anymore.

Each combing is glassed into the hull to ensure it’s very secure.

She's nearly done...

One of the cool features that will be installed on the boat in the image above is a a Seaward Smart Rudder. This is a custom handmade rudder built by Seaward out of aluminum and stainless steel for strength and corrosion resistance. Rudder lines are run under the deck in low friction teflon housing to keep the exterior of the boat clean and free of any unnecessary snag points for safety. The rudder cables appear back on the deck just in front of the paddler so they can easily deploy/retract the rudder without having to twist around behind them and risk getting unbalanced like on  many kayaks. The rudder pedals are unique in that they are attached to the boat’s tracks solidly to allow for effective bracing even if a rudder cable were to break.

Rudder and handle have their own bungees for secure transport...

One of my least favourite transport rituals with my current plastic kayak is to duct tape the rudder and carrying handle to the boat so they aren’t flailing around at 110kph on the highway – potentially getting damaged and certainly marking up the boat’s finish. I was happy to see that Seaward has thought of this and each part has its own bungee so you can secure them in a couple seconds without hassles and without leaving tape residue on your lovely boat.

Hard 2 part hatch...

Seawards Greenland style kayaks use the smaller rubber hatches I talked about in my previous post about their thermoform kayaks. The larger North American style boats use a 2 part hatch like the one shown above. It is made up of a hard exterior hatch with a neoprene seal underneath. This provides the optimal combination of waterproofing and durability for hard use like expeditions or tour operations.

Note the bungee partially over the hatch combing...

Although these hatches are tough it’s possible that over the course of a couple decades you could damage or lose a hatch. This could be a major problem on a tour when you need a seaworthy boat to get you safely home. Seaward has thought of this and addressed this potential problem in 3 ways:

  1. both the hard outer shell and neoprene seal are attached to the deck with bungees so they can’t blow/float away
  2. in the image above you can see a hatch bungee partially over the combing…you can use any fabric [tarp, garbage bag, tent fly, etc...] to create a DIY waterproof hatch cover by placing it under both hatch bungees – very cool!
  3. Seward has used the same hatch shapes for a couple decades and doesn’t plan on changing so when you call them for a replacement hatch cover for your 20yr old boat after you run yours over – the answer will be “…sure no problem!…”

Quick release paddle float rescue system...

Their fiberglass boats get the smart quick release paddle float rescue system I discussed in my previous thermoform production post. I really dig this feature and it makes me feel much safer as I consider paddling in the rough waters of Vancouver Island.

A bunch of Seaward kayaks waiting to travel to their new homes...

I feel like I am not doing these high quality kayaks justice. There are many features and design elements that Doug passed on that I’ve forgotten and others that I know I am just unaware of. However, I am learning a ton about Seaward and their kayaks which was my goal. Trust me when I say that being around a bunch of finished Seaward fiberglass and kevlar kayaks is like walking around a Ferrari factory…glossy high performance goodness all over the place! Given my humble kayaking resume I feel unworthy of such beautiful boats that have carried expert paddlers on amazing expeditions all around the world…;-)

Some of the Seaward Kayaks pallet of colours...

Now that we’ve looked at how Seaward makes their thermoform and fiberglass/kelvar boats the obvious questions are:

  • what style of kayak should I buy?
  • what type of material should I be after?
I’ll tackle these topics in my next two Seaward Factory Tour posts.