Blue Seal Sealant Review

16 10 2012

Photo: All Hail the Black Market Blog…

First off thanks to All Hail the Black Market Blog for being smart enough to take a picture of these tubes of Blue Seal Sealant before he used them or gave them away – unlike me! ;) I received 2 tubes of the stuff for free from the distributor to review last year. Seeing as my tubeless setups were all okay using Stan’s I didn’t feel like reinstalling my tires just to test the sealant. So I gave 1 tube to Scott and 1 tube to Kurt. Both were installing ghetto tubeless setups on their bikes.

I spent a lot of time helping Kurt get his mountain bike setup tubeless. It was a pain at first, but that’s because he’s using rims and tires that were not designed for a tubeless application. We eventually got the tires to hold air reliably with Blue Seal. I don’t think that’s any fault of the sealant. It was simply a tough application.

Scott’s setup worked as far I know. He had one front wheel burp that was not possible to reseal on the trail, but he’s running a ghetto tubeless setup as well so I wouldn’t blame that on the sealant. It seemed as messy to deal with as Stan’s when we tried to re-seat the tire. Sealant is gooey by nature.

There were no punctures during the test period. Although Kurt found a decent sized hole [ie. large thorn] in one of his tires during setup. It took a little bit for the hole to seal 100%, but it’s fine now. I had a similar sized hole in one of my 29er tires and it took several tries with Stan’s to seal. I couldn’t convince Kurt or Scott to run over nails to test the sealing properties of this product further. ;)

Blue Seal…

Here’s the manufacturer’s spew:

Finally and environmentally-sound, non toxic inner tube flat preventive. ALSO works with tubeless tires. It forms a seal using natural nano-fibers which harden up to form a plug when exposed to air. Doesn’t leave an oily or sticky mess like other sealant…you know what we mean if you’ve ever had to change a tube or tire that experience punctures with sealants. Applicator tube includes valve core removal tool.”

I have no way to evaluate the environmental claims of the product and we didn’t try putting any into tubes as a sealant.

Tire sealant like inner tubes is not a glory product. Unless it lets you down you really don’t notice it. Blue Seal worked fine with ghetto tubeless setups. If it was on the shelf at my LBS I’d be happy to use it.


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4 responses

16 10 2012
Vic303

So what do you do when you need to change out a tire? Either through wear or excessive damage, say to a sidewall–what then? Is it as messy as I think? How do you clean the goop off the rim so it does not harden while you are swapping the tire? How do you keep it from oozing all over the sidewalls, or the work table when no tire is on the rim? I ask, because the concept of tubeless is intriguing, but seems way too messy to bother with.

16 10 2012
thelazyrando

@Vic – it’s not terrible. I moved a set of tubeless tires from my Nomad’s stock rims to the new P35s I built up. I just took them off the old rim. That wasn’t too messy as the sealant inside was months old and less runny than new. I dumped the old sealant out and reinstalled the tires on the new rims. Threw in a few ounces of fresh sealant and pumped them up. I had to wipe down the rims and wash my hands when I was done.

The old rims have some sealant on them and one day when I am bored I’ll clean them up with some hot soapy water before I install new tires on them.

Personally I’ll never go back to tubes in my mountain bikes and will start to convert some of my road going bikes to tubeless as well.

16 10 2012
theporcelainrocket

This sealant has worked just as well as Stan’s in the period of time that I’ve been using it. The one burp that I did have was running a non-tubeless WTB Nano on a Stan’s Arch rim. Switching back to a WTB Weirwolf 2.55 on the Arches has solved all burpring issues.

While on a recent bikepacking trip in Oregon, I had several small punctures in the front tire, and the sealant did it’s job (with a quick spin of the front wheel) to my expectations, and with no real performance differences from Stan’s. All of the punctures sealed relatively quickly, and without a need to fish around in the framebag for my pump until the end of the day.

When I switched tires, there were not the usual “Stan’s boogers” inside the tires. Rather, the Blue Seal sealant was still mostly fluid.

The advantage that I see in the Blue Seal is that it does not have the ammonia smell that Stan’s has. Otherwise, these are very comparable products.

I haven’t checked on the price comparison between Blue Seal and Stan’s. What say you, Vik?

Scott

16 10 2012
thelazyrando

I have only seen one online source for the Blue Seal product and it is $19.99 which is more than Stan’s, but that’s through SOMA which I would expect would be higher priced. I assume some LBS carry Blue Seal, but I don’t know what they would price it at relative to Stan’s. Locally I don’t know of any shop you can buy Blue Seal at.

http://store.somafab.com/blue-seal-puncture-sealant-fluide.html

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