Practical Roadie

18 02 2010

Fendered Pacer at Campione Cycles

Who says a fast road bike can’t be practical?  I spotted this nicely built up Surly Pacer roadie at Campione Cycles recently. Fenders and bar end shifters aren’t typical on a road bike, but there isn’t anything wrong with them.  Particularly the fenders which makes this bike a whole lot more fun to ride in the rain than a typical road rig.

Fender detail...


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18 responses

18 02 2010
jamesmallon

“Very pretty General, Very pretty. But can they fight? ” – The Dirt Dozen

That’s what I think of the fenders. Too short in front to keep the chainrings clean, and junk is going to spray right out the uncurved sides.

“Fenders and bar end shifters aren’t typical on a road bike.” As you know, they’re traditional.

18 02 2010
Vik

Sure the fenders are short. I used SKS Race Blades on my commuter road bike which were even shorter and they definitely helped when I was out and it started to rain.

Cannondale R800

Nowhere near as good as full coverage fenders, but good enough to be worth using.

18 02 2010
DerrickP

What kind of fenders are those? I think they’re great for their intentions.

18 02 2010
thelazyrando

They came off another bike….not sure which one….the guy who bought it didn’t want fenders so the shop stripped them and put them on the Pacer.

18 02 2010
DerrickP

I think they look great. I looked in my garage the other day and realized that every one of my bikes has fenders now (other than my mountain bike). It happened slowly without me noticing. It’s so much nicer. And even in the last week I found myself commuting on my MTB because of snow and desperately wanting fenders. Roads were sloppy and it didn’t take long before I was, too. Lesson learned!

18 02 2010
gareth

To be safe those front mudguards (fenders) really need a quick release on them – there is a very small clearance which if it blocks the rider will be over the bars

18 02 2010
ToddBS

I’ve been absolutely drooling over the new green Pacers. I may have to pop down to the LBS (after my tax return) and order a custom built one. I’m not overly fond of the stock build on the Pacer complete bike.

18 02 2010
ToddBS

Is that a very small frame? I didn’t think the Pacer had that much top tube slope.

18 02 2010
vik

That’s a 50cm and a 6′ guy standing holding it.

18 02 2010
vik

Ya the green Pacer looks sweet…=-)

19 02 2010
jamesmallon

‘gareth’, I’ve read that, but not gone over my bars in that situation: not even on my fixed paddywagon’s geometry. I skid, sure, but I think some people have really poor balance to endo that badly.

20 02 2010
gareth

James – I just think it is an unnecessary risk – I used to ride a road bike with close clearances and Salmon Profile aluminium mudguards and wouldn’t go back to that set up – typically with plastic mudguards they will deform or shatter in the event of a blockage, not so aluminium.

20 02 2010
thelazyrando

Looking around my apartment I have 6 bikes with fenders at the moment. Only 2 have QRs on the front struts.

20 02 2010
gareth

Looking around the web it is not difficult to find stories of mudguard jamming accidents

20 02 2010
thelazyrando

Like most safety related issues [helmets, lighting, defensive riding, etc..] it comes down to a personal evaluation of the risks involved in your own situation.

Many many serious head injuries would be prevented if people wore a helmet from the time they got up until the time they went to bed. Falling down stairs and on curbs is a lot more common than we think. I’ve tripped and fallen walking 10x more than I’ve fallen off a bike.

At some point you have to decide to not worry about a particular risk…the result of that decision is different for each of us. There is no “right” answer.

21 02 2010
gareth

I quite agree that there is no right answer and if my original comment suggested otherwise, I would like to be very clear that I absolutely agree that it is down to a personal evaluation of the risk.

The risk is comprised of two elements, the probability of an occurrence and the likely consequences. In the case of the bike pictured, the likelihood of a problem is made greater by the use of metal for the mudguards and the close clearances. The likely consequences are directly related to velocity of the bike and rider in the event of a problem. Falling when you are cycling at 25 mph will always be more likely to result in serious injury than walking at 3 mph.

21 02 2010
More Snow and mudguards | Combing my hair....

[...] was prompted by a comment on a post on Vik’s Lazy Randonneur site. You can see the post here. Essentially my comment was that a road bike with close clearance aluminium mudguards would be [...]

21 02 2010
thelazyrando

I’m pretty sure there are more serious injuries and deaths each year from falling down stairs each year than serious fender related accidents.

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